5 hours ago   •   3 notes

hobbyhorse

noun

1a : a stick having an imitation horse’s head at one end that a child pretends to ride
b : a rocking horsec : a toy horse suspended by springs from a frame
2: a topic to which one constantly reverts
EXAMPLES

"The intricate toys, hobbyhorses and tiny working carriages, were made for child play before the eras of radio, TV, Nintendo or Internet.” — Wendi Winters, The Capital (Annapolis, Maryland), December 24, 2006 

"This has long been a hobbyhorse for McCain; who could forget—literally, because he said it roughly 1 billion times during the 2000/2008 campaigns—that Congress spent $3 million to study the DNA of bears in Montana?" — Chris Cillizza, WashingtonPost.com, May 7, 2014

Try to incorporate this word into your next 100 words or write a drabble inspired by this word/definition.  If you feel brave, post the excerpt using the word with the tag #dailydictionarydrabble so we can see it!  

Both Original Works and Fanfiction are encouraged and welcome.

Credit goes to Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for words, definitions, and examples.

6 hours ago   •   17,701 notes   •   VIA writeworld   •   SOURCE pablolf

I did things in my 30s that were ignored by the world, that could have been quickly labeled a failure. Here’s a classic example; in 1974 I did a movie called Phantom of the Paradise. Phantom of the Paradise, which was a huge flop in this country. There were only two cities in the world where it had any real success: Winnipeg, in Canada, and Paris, France. So, okay, let’s write it off as a failure. Maybe you could do that.

But all of the sudden, I’m in Mexico, and a 16-year-old boy comes up to me at a concert with an album - a Phantom of the Paradise soundtrack- and asks me to sign it. I sign it. Evidently I was nice to him and we had a nice little conversation. I don’t remember the moment, I remember signing the album (I don’t know if I think I remember or if I actually remember). But this little 14 or 16, whatever old this guy was… Well I know who the guy is now because I’m writing a musical based on Pan’s Labyrinth; it’s Guillermo del Toro.

The work that I’ve done with Daft Punk it’s totally related to them seeing Phantom of the Paradise 20 times and deciding they’re going to reach out to this 70-year-old songwriter to get involved in an album called Random Access Memories.

So, what is the lesson in that? The lesson for me is being very careful about what you label a failure in your life. Be careful about throwing something in the round file as garbage because you may find that it’s the headwaters of a relationship that you can’t even imagine it’s coming in your future.

6 hours ago   •   49 notes   •   VIA copykiller   •   SOURCE copykiller

Go Ahead: Crap Away

copykiller:

"Don’t be afraid to write crap because crap makes great fertilizer." 

-Jessica Brody 

image

7 hours ago   •   5 notes

prompt

In honor of the Hobbit trailer that just came out have a Hobbit inspired prompt!

"Home is behind; the world ahead" 

Edge of Night

Write a short story using this quote for inspiration.

If you’d like to show us what you’re written, we would love to see it! You can tag it as #funprompt or email us at writersyoga@gmail.com or submit it to us.

12 hours ago   •   423 notes   •   VIA thewritingcafe   •   SOURCE thewritingcafe
Anonymous ASKED: How can I make my writing sound less... boring? I also have trouble with using the same words over again, so on one page the same word describes the same action twice or more.

thewritingcafe:

Let’s look at what might make your writing boring:

  • Style: If your writing reads as “this happened and then this happened and then this happened”, if you’re not rewriting anything to improve it, or if you’re using redundancies, your style is the problem. There is a style tag on my tags page that can help you with this, but you can also look at the description tag.
  • Plot: Sometimes the plot can be boring without the story being boring, but the characters need to be superb in those stories. If your story is not heavily character driven, your plot can’t be boring. Make sure there are risks. Let your characters lose every now and then. Make it interesting. The plot and plot development tags on the tags page can help with this.
  • Too Much Detail: Unless it’s important, you don’t need to describe your characters making breakfast or getting dressed. It adds too much unnecessary detail. Ask someone to read over your writing. Have them highlight or underline everything they skip over or have them mark the places where they start to skip parts of writing. Get rid of those parts or rewrite them.
  • Pacing: If you have slow pacing where slow pacing is not needed, the writing will come off as boring. Too much description and too slow of a transition from one idea or event to the next can slow down your pacing. For tips on this, check the tags page for the pacing tag.
  • Long Paragraphs or Long Sentences: If most of your writing is a string of long sentences and long paragraphs, it can come off as boring. Add some variety in sentence length. Make sure paragraphs aren’t too long. People tend to get bored when a long paragraph is coming up.
  • Too Formal: Creative writing does not have to exist within the rules of academic writing. You can start sentences with “because” and you can write a paragraph that is only one word long. Mix it up. Find your writing style.
  • No Devices: Try using metaphors, similes, foreshadowing, allusion, symbolism, and other literary devices to deepen your writing.
  • Glue Words: This ties in with style. Glue words are words that can be taken out of the sentence without losing meaning. They’re words like: on, out, up, through, after, before, in, but, the, etc. Instead of “He came into the room through the door.” you can say “He came into the room.”
  • Character: It’s easier to write a boring story if you write in first person because the reader is then closer to this character. If a character has a boring voice, the story will be boring. Check the style and voice tag for help with this.
18 hours ago   •   2,783 notes   •   VIA characterandwritinghelp   •   SOURCE saladinahmed
saladinahmed:

Questions you should ask yourself about your Strong Female Character. From this excellent article: http://t.co/efkvvUqsum

saladinahmed:

Questions you should ask yourself about your Strong Female Character. From this excellent article: http://t.co/efkvvUqsum

1 day ago   •   15 notes
How much development should I put my secondary characters through? Should they be as developed as my main characters, or should I just do the basics - their name and age and how they develop the story?
Every character in your story is a person. Think about the people in your life. They have feelings, opinions, good/funny/sad stories, they have a range of experiences that make up who they are. That’s what makes them interesting. They are not in your life for a single purpose; they do so much more than help you with your math homework, for example. It should be like that with your secondary characters.
Your secondary characters need to be their own. They need to develop throughout the story because the effects of whatever events are happening are happening to them as well. Your secondary characters may have a singular purpose to your main character, but try not to write them that way. Otherwise your they won’t feel rounded out. It’ll just feel like your main character is the sun and you have these pieces of rock going around it.
However, it is the main character’s story—the main character tells the story through his/her/ze eyes. So things will sort of involve the main character a little more. You also don’t want to get sidetracked by exploring things that may be important to the secondary characters, but not to the story. 
A simplified answer to your question (that is my opinion of course) would be to develop your secondary characters as much as your main characters. Even though you’ll have all this information, you most likely won’t use it all. But if these characters are as complex and developed as your main character then when you write them, they will feel much more complex and real. Hopefully, as real as the people you know.
Hope this was helpful!
-Ash
1 day ago   •   6 notes

unregenerate

adjective

1: not spiritually reborn or converted
2a : not reformed : unreconstructed
b : obstinate, stubborn
EXAMPLES

"She sings … in a voice that could melt the heart of the mostunregenerate musical hater.” — Charles Isherwood, The New York Times, May 18, 2008 

"A string of revivals later known as the Great Awakening blazed up and down the eastern seaboard—although scholars suspect that many of these new converts soon backslid into theirunregenerate ways.” — Molly Worthen, The Daily Beast, June 1, 2014

Try to incorporate this word into your next 100 words or write a drabble inspired by this word/definition.  If you feel brave, post the excerpt using the word with the tag #dailydictionarydrabble so we can see it!  

Both Original Works and Fanfiction are encouraged and welcome.

Credit goes to Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Day for words, definitions, and examples.

1 day ago   •   318 notes   •   VIA jenesaispourquoi   •   SOURCE hargashouseofribs

badwolfcomplex:

hargashouseofribs:

Ahhhhhh! New Discworld/Tiffany Aching is on its way!

WHAT

WHAT

IS THIS REALLY REAL

I CAN’T

#guys  #books  
1 day ago   •   4 notes

prompt

Find your favorite image (If you don’t have one, go look for one!). Why is it your favorite image? What is it about the image that speaks to you? Create a list about what it is about the image that you like. Once you’re written this list, apply this list to a scene of a story you’re working on. Or create a new story.

If you’d like to show us what you’re written, we would love to see it! You can tag it as #funprompt or email us at writersyoga@gmail.com or submit it to us.