7 hours ago   •   157 notes   •   VIA characterandwritinghelp   •   SOURCE readingwithavengeance

On Writing: Self-Defense Myths

readingwithavengeance:

A few of the myths and misconceptions I see about self-defense in fiction.  Please note that self-defense is a pretty fractured body of work that doesn’t have much in the way of rigorous, peer-reviewed studies, so you’ll find people who disagree with me on a few points, but in general:

  • Self-defense classes are a scam.  Some of them are openly and obviously a scam.  Some of them are just a bit misguided.  The majority of them won’t help you do jack-diddly-squat in a real attack.  Truly effective self-defense depends upon being adaptive and reactive, but most classes teach formulas and prescribed steps for “moves.”  These moves will range from being an utter joke to being useful only in the exact right set of circumstances.  The main pitfall of the majority of self-defense classes, however, is the way the participants practice.  Due to safety reasons, you usually can’t get the all-out, random, formless, tooth-and-nail style that criminal attacks tend to follow.  Classes will have their sparing bouts follow rules, go slow, and partners will only ‘attack’ each other in predictable, teachable ways.  This is useful as a baby step, but useless if the teaching goes no further.  A character can be overly reliant and confident in their self-defense classes, but they should also be in for a nasty surprise during the first fight.

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14 hours ago   •   145 notes   •   VIA maggie-stiefvater   •   SOURCE maggie-stiefvater
whispertohappiness ASKED: As a short-haired tough-talking girl, I'm not a huge fan of reinforcing gender stereotypes, as you might imagine. I think the beauty of genderswapping characters is not to give them relly, really stereotypical feminine or masculine traits, but to show that the traits that truly define them (whether it be intelligence, or delicacy, or aggression) are gender-neutral. When correctly done, that can be very powerful.

maggie-stiefvater:

crofethr:

maggie-stiefvater:

publishing this ask as is because I think it’s a great defense of genderswapping

All traits are gender neutral and individual-specific. The assignment of certain character traits to a gender is a social construct, but one so longstanding and ingrained that it just looks, at first blush, like ‘this is how girls are’ and ‘this is how boys are’.

That’s bullshit. And I’m glad these are things that are finally being closely examined and deconstructed and played with.

And reblogging this reply because it goes the other way, and is more articulate about my discomfort than I could manage to be before.

1 day ago   •   4,461 notes   •   VIA moonblossom   •   SOURCE tristinawright

When I was learning how to critique other writers’ stories, one of my biggest lessons was this: Critique the story they wrote, not the story you wish they’d written.

 -

Jodi Meadows (via tristinawright)

Very important, critiquers and editors!

(via tamorapierce)

1 day ago   •   18,856 notes   •   VIA theworldofgoldfish   •   SOURCE charliezardrps

charliezardrps:

not all character development exists to make someone a better person

people turn into assholes, too. They become more  manipulative, arrogant, clingy, irritated… complex.

and that’s okay, that’s important.

explore that.

✧・゚:*✧・゚:* \(◕‿◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

2 days ago   •   33 notes   •   VIA copykiller   •   SOURCE copykiller

Describe a Person as a Setting

copykiller:

We’ve talked about the opposite method before

Now this time, let’s describe a person as a setting.  

Consider that any person could be described as a room: warm, shabby, inviting, chilling, ghostly, pleasant, symmetrical. 

Try it out. 

image

2 days ago   •   17,504 notes   •   VIA fixyourwritinghabits   •   SOURCE grangerandherbooks

Underrated mythological creatures in YA books 

tubooks:

betsycornwell:

grangerandherbooks:

I have always loved mythological creatures, but I think too many YA paranormal books focus on four creatures: vampires, werewolves, angels and fairies. So with the help of my followers (really they did all the work, I just wrote down…

#books  
2 days ago   •   428 notes   •   VIA characterandwritinghelp   •   SOURCE write-like-a-freak

Boys I Want to See in YA:

write-like-a-freak:

(Fems I Want to See in YA)

  • Trans* boys
  • Fat boys
  • Boys who are really bad at like almost everything
  • Not-hot boys. Like just average looking boys.
  • Boys with acne
  • Boys who are love interests and aren’t dark and scary but are, like, normal
  • Nerd boys hell yeah
  • Boys who don’t have a love interest
  • Boys with girl BFFs
  • Ridiculous boys who say and do ridiculous things, for good or for bad
  • Boys who are terrible aND AREN’T FORGIVEN FOR THEIR TERRIBLENESS BY THEIR 1. HOTNESS 2. TRAGIC BACKSTORY. Boys who are just terrible and compelling anyway.
  • Boys who realistically interact with love interests (I can tell you that there are very, very few teen boys who will go out of their way to flirt with you if you are aloof and cold. Or even just not-flirty. The fragility of their male ego doesn’t usually allow for it.)
  • GOOD GUYS
  • Boys who don’t constantly pursue a fuck
  • Boys who have risen above gender roles and societal expectations for their personality or behavior or whatever
  • Boys who are drowning in gender roles and societal expectations for their personality and behavior or whatever
  • Boys who don’t get the girl
  • Funny, optimistic, good-natured boys (I’m done with snarky sarcastic cynical boys really I am. I’m done with snarky sarcastic cynical anyone really.)
  • Boys who see the stupidity going on around them and don’t participate (but aren’t cynical)
3 days ago   •   1 note
Happy Easter, my peeps. No gif this time, sorry! I’m way too tired from climbing ahaha.

Happy Easter, my peeps. No gif this time, sorry! I’m way too tired from climbing ahaha.

3 days ago   •   593 notes   •   VIA thewritingcafe   •   SOURCE thewritingcafe
thewritingcafe:

This is a basic guide. If you want to know every detail about the economy of your world, you’ll have to do extra research for that specific system. These systems will have to be adapted to fit your world, your population, and the resources available to your characters.
An economic system is an exchange of services and goods. This can be on a large scale (within an entire population) or a small scale (within a single family). Therefore, the economic structure of your world is not simply “this will be a market economy”. You have to create the acceptable or expected forms of exchange between individuals. This will add depth to your culture and the way your characters behave.
FORMS OF EXCHANGE

Market: This is when products are measured by money and sold for money, which is then used to purchase other goods. The goal is to gain more money and more goods. Market economies exist on the following:

Market economies are self-regulating.
The majority of the population makes a living by selling goods and services on the market.
All goods and services (private and public) have value.
Factors of production are distributed, dispensed, and allocated by the market.


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thewritingcafe:

This is a basic guide. If you want to know every detail about the economy of your world, you’ll have to do extra research for that specific system. These systems will have to be adapted to fit your world, your population, and the resources available to your characters.

An economic system is an exchange of services and goods. This can be on a large scale (within an entire population) or a small scale (within a single family). Therefore, the economic structure of your world is not simply “this will be a market economy”. You have to create the acceptable or expected forms of exchange between individuals. This will add depth to your culture and the way your characters behave.

FORMS OF EXCHANGE

Market: This is when products are measured by money and sold for money, which is then used to purchase other goods. The goal is to gain more money and more goods. Market economies exist on the following:
  • Market economies are self-regulating.
  • The majority of the population makes a living by selling goods and services on the market.
  • All goods and services (private and public) have value.
  • Factors of production are distributed, dispensed, and allocated by the market.

Read More

3 days ago   •   1,212 notes   •   VIA writeworld   •   SOURCE terribleminds

Writing a book is easy. Writing a *good* book is hard. It’s like shitting out a typewriter one painful, jagged mechanical part at a time.

 - terribleminds.com (via terribleminds)